Here’s Where All the Vegan Food is Hiding
Vegan food isn’t hard to find – more and more options are popping up left and right. Between your traditional grocery store, specialty food stores and farmer’s markets, there’s a steady supply of vegan offerings for anyone who’s looking. But it’s the latest trend – vegan food that shows up at your doorstep – that should put an end to all the excuses.

There was a time some years back when a vegan diet sounded nice, but the ingredients were too obscure and too challenging to source. It was likely a bad excuse then, but it’s even worse now – options for buying vegan are proliferating. Best of all, you can go to the food – or the food can come to you.

If you go even further back, the fruits, vegetables, beans or nuts that make up a good portion of a vegan diet were literally in your own backyard. During our agricultural days, when we had a more intimate connection to the land, there was no processed foods, artificial sweeteners or unnatural preservatives to be found. To be sure, there was animal meat on the menu – but even that wasn’t filled with industrial-grade hormones like it is today.

But in the time since, we’ve taken the “family” out of the “family farm”, and replaced it with a highly-mechanized factory. This vastly changed the economics of our food production system. And our national priorities changed, too – we began subsidizing corn production, and putting it and its derivatives into everything we possibly could.

So with cheap meat and fructose everywhere, who got the short end of the stick? Namely the fresh stuff – the fruits and veggies.

It’s taken a lot of education to remind our society that our bodies aren’t intended for factory food production, and that the cures to so many of our chronic ailments lie right within our diets. Now we’re searching high and low for these superfoods – sometimes to be disappointed with selection or availability.

But don’t despair! If you’re on your own scavenger hunt for vegan food, here’s your roadmap to follow.

  • Grocery Stores – Work the Perimeter!

    Certain chain grocers value all-natural foods more than others, so seek one with a good reputation for carrying health products. But there is one commonality amongst nearly all food stores – the fresh stuff is usually on the outer sections, while the inner aisles are for frozen goods and chips and snacks.

  • Co-Ops and Farm Stands

    There’s a certain kind of satisfaction that comes with knowing where your food comes from. You can do just that by participating in a CSA (community-supported agriculture) cooperative. This usually means committing to a certain level of food purchases even before the growing season. This lets the farmer plan his or her crop in advance, reducing spoilage and other risks. Otherwise, search online for your closest farm stand, and pick a Saturday morning for a visit.

  • Home Gardening

    Have a green thumb? You can use one if you want to give some do-it-yourself food growing a shot. With a little practice and resourcefulness (YouTube instructional videos are your best friend!), you can have a surprisingly supple yield of cucumbers, green beans, tomatoes or more. This will vary by geography, but there’s nothing like the pride and fulfillment of eating that which you’ve grown yourself!

  • Vegan Home Delivery Service

    Let’s face it – the options above have actually been in existence for generations, but we modern folk live complex, busy lives. There’s finally a way to experience the myriad benefits of a vegan diet without even leaving home. Delivery services like Fresh n’ Lean’s will not just bring the ingredients to your doorstep, but plan and prepare the meals themselves. All that’s left is to heat and serve. The convenience factor is huge – but the real reward will come in time as your body settles in for a truly all-natural, 100% plant-based diet.

If you successfully convert to a vegan lifestyle, you’ll probably be asked where you find the time to shop for all the vegan ingredients to supply your family’s meals. Then it’s your turn to be the educator – let them know the options that are all around us, and help to deliver a healthy future to your neighbors.

Sources:

SparkPeople.com